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Frequently Asked Questions

Can I have a business in my home?

What is the population of Longmont?

What kind of household pets are allowed? Which pets require a license?

Who should I report violations and/or nuisances regarding animals?

How many unrelated person can live in a household?

What's happening next door? (new development)

How area transportation issues involved in the planning process?

What should I do when I receive a public notice?

Do I need a permit to build a fence?

What are the future plans for widening of a street?

How do I find out the zoning on my property?

How do I find my property line?

 

 

Can I have a business in my home?

Answer:Home occupation (home business) is allowed in all residential zoning districts in the City of Longmont. It is an accessory use, meaning the home occupation is secondary to the primary use on the lot (the residence). The total area of a home occupation cannot be greater than one-half the first floor area of the house. For example, if the first floor is 1,000 square feet in size, the home occupation can take up 500 square feet. It does not have to be located on the first floor, but can be in a basement, on the second floor, or in a garage. The City regulates home occupations, and they have to meet a number of criteria, including that employees of the home occupation must live in the house where it is located and that it does not change the appearance of the residence. Note that there may be additional restrictions on home businesses that could be part of the covenants within a subdivision. The city does not enforce covenants; homeowners need to contact the homeowners association (HOA) within their development.

Someone who wants to establish a home business needs to obtain a home occupation license from the City (a one-time fee). A sales tax license may also be necessary, depending upon the type of business. A home occupation, once established, should not change the character of the neighborhood and should be unnoticeable to surrounding residents. This means it should not generate or result in nuisances such as traffic, noise glare, odor, fumes, electric interference, or other impacts greater than usually associated with residential uses.

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What is the population of Longmont? What is the average income/education level? What percentage of our population is Hispanic/African American/Asian?

Answer: The population in Longmont was estimated to be 87,461 at the end of 2010. The Planning and Development Services Division calculates population estimates every year based on the number of housing units in the City and some assumptions about the number of people per unit, vacancy rates, etc.

 

What kind of household pets are allowed? Which pets require a license?

Answer: The section in the Longmont Municipal Code states household pets that are animals owned and kept for personal companionship or protection with the following exceptions: skunks, non-domestic cats, wolves and other wild canine species, poisonous reptiles, bears, raccoon and livestock.

Potbellied pigs are allowed as a household pet. A domesticated Vietnamese potbellied pig weighing less than 95 pounds is allowed as a household pet if registered with the Goldstar Registry of the Potbellied Pig Registry, Inc., or if a veterinarian licensed in Colorado certifies it is a Vietnamese potbellied pig.

All cats, dogs and Vietnamese potbellied pigs must be licensed. Please contact the Longmont Humane Society at 303-772-1212.

All chickens must be licensed through the City of Longmont. For questions regarding backyard chicken hen permits contact Ben Ortiz at 303-774-4725 or by e-mail at ben.ortiz@ci.longmont.co.us.

Backyard Chicken Hen Permit Application.

 

How many unrelated persons can live in a household?

Answer: No more than five individuals not related by blood, marriage, adoption or pursuant to legal guardianship. Please contact Code Enforcement for further information at 303-651-8332.

 

What is happening next door?

Answer: Often times you will see signs that development is likely to be occurring soon in your neighborhood. For example, you will see stakes in the ground used to mark property boundaries or building locations, grading (changing of the ground level) occurring, or paint marks on the streets and sidewalks indicating underground utility locations. When you see these early signs, you can contact the Planning and Development Services Division to find out what is going to go there in the near future.

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How are transportation issues involved in the planning process?

Answer: Transportation issues are directly related to land use planning by a "cause and effect" relationship. As land development proposals are reviewed by City staff, potential impacts to the transportation network are evaluated. Often improvements are required to the street network because of the land development project. City transportation planning staff also maintains a computer program that projects future traffic volumes. These volumes alert staff of future needed improvements on specific road segments. These projects are scheduled on the Capital Improvement Program (CIP) budget as the need arises for them. Often a resident will call the City wanting verification of a rumor they heard concerning the improvements of a street in the City. Staff can check the CIP to see if the street is scheduled for an improvement project and provide the resident with the needed and correct information.

 

What should I do when I receive a public notice?

Answer: A public hearing is a process that is intended to provide members of the public an opportunity to address the Planning and Zoning Commission and the City Council on matters concerning land development and other public interests. If and when you receive a public hearing notice or see a public hearing sign posted on a property:

 

Do I need a permit to build a fence?

Answer: A building permit is required for any new fence or any change in material, type, size, or location of an existing fence. A permit is also required for total replacement of a fence. However, if the fence is not located on a property line, such as one installed around a patio for privacy, a permit is not needed. Permits are reviewed and issued by the Building Inspection Division office located at 385 Kimbark Street. Call 303-651-8332 for information. Fences must conform to setbacks and height limits, and no electric fences are permitted. Fences must be located on or within an applicant's property lines. A property survey is recommended if property pins cannot be found. Locating property lines is the responsibility of the property owner; the City does not provide this service. More information about fences can also be found in the Land Development Code, Chapter 15.05 Development Standards.

What are the future plans for widening of a street?

Answer: Streets or roads are usually widened in Longmont when traffic volumes approach a critical threshold that requires additional capacity. Projects are then scheduled on the Capital Improvement Plan (CIP). Some road widening will occur as a component of the development on land adjacent to a road. The Public Works staff can answer any questions related to exactly when a widening project will occur.

 

How do I find out the zoning on my property?

Answer: The City has a Zoning District map for all property within the City limits. To find out what a particular property is zoned, search the City's interactive zoning map. Zoning questions can also be emailed to longmont.planning@ci.longmont.co.us or you may stop by the Planning Division and review the map in person. The map is also available for purchase. A property's zoning dictates allowable uses and certain building restrictions. The zoning classifications can also be reviewed in the Municipal Code.

 

How do I find my property line?

Answer: The City does not locate property boundaries in the field for City residents. There may be surveying stakes or pins on your property which will help locate your property's boundaries. Copies of subdivision plats in the City are available for review or purchase at the Development Services Center. They show the shape and dimensions of your lot and where surveying pins were placed on the ground in your subdivision. This information may help you in your search. Surveying stakes or pins are usually located at the corners of your property. In recent years, they typically are 1/2 inch diameter rebar so you may not find any on the ground. If this is the case, the best course of action is to hire a Land Surveyor to located your property's boundaries. People often ask if their fence is on their property line or how far from the center line of the street is their property. While fences and center lines of streets may give you a general idea of where your property line is, they are not accurate indicators. For example, fences are not always located on property lines. Instead, they may be located inside a property line so that a property owner can maintain both sides of it. To accurately determine your property's boundaries, it is best to hire a land surveyor to survey your property or set new pins. Land Surveyors are listed in the Yellow Pages.

 

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