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Police Department, Department Guide


Information Services Division, 9-1-1 Emergency Communication Center

Manager: Patti West

 

 

The Longmont Emergency Communication Center (LECC) is the public safety answering point for the City of Longmont. All 911 calls and a myriad of other emergency and non-emergency calls are routed to the LECC for processing. Our highly trained Communications Specialists prioritize all calls as requests for emergency, urgent and less critical calls for service. They identify the best resource for police, fire, and the ambulance to resolve each incident and route the information appropriately 24 hours a day, 365 days per year.

The LECC staff are certified Emergency Medical Dispatchers, a program with which the Communications Specialist can provide immediate "over the phone" professional medical coaching to victims and their families prior to the arrival of fire and ambulance paramedic/EMT personnel. The Communications Specialists are trained to gather critical information from citizens who may be experiencing the most traumatic times of the lives and who are often confused, angry, and may not be rational. The Communication Specialists are the first contact for citizens during times of crisis and emergency. In many instances, the Communication Specialists can utilize their training to provide immediate assistance to callers without sending field units or by referring callers to other resource.

The Longmont Emergency Communications Center is budgeted for 17 full-time Communication Specialists, three supervisors, and one manager. The LECC is equipped with TDD capability to serve the hearing impaired. The TDD number is (303)772-1478.

LECC Manager, Patti West, can be reached at (303)651-8550.

WHEN SHOULD YOU DIAL 9-1-1?
9-1-1 is the phone number that should be dialed whenever police, fire or ambulance services are needed for an EMERGENCY. When you dial 9-1-1 from your landline phone from a fixed location in your home, your address and phone number will show up on the phone screen in the dispatch center. Dialing 9-1-1 is used when someone is hurt or in danger, or if you are in immediate need of police, fire or medical assistance.

CAN I DIAL 9-1-1 FROM A PAY PHONE?

You may dial 9-1-1 for an emergency at any pay phone without needing any coins. The phone number and locations of the pay phone will show up on the dispatch monitor.

WHAT IF I DIAL 9-1-1 BY MISTAKE?

DO NOT HANG UP! You may have called 9-1-1 by accident, or your situation may have resolved itself, but it is important to let the 9-1-1 operator know this. The dispatchers are going to assume that something has gone very wrong and will either call you back or send help anyway. This is particularly important if you dial from a business phone with several phone lines. Anytime the dispatcher receives a 9-1-1 "hang-up" the caller must be contacted to be sure that no actual emergency exists. If your business has dozens of phone lines, it may be impossible for the dispatcher to determine who, if anyone, needs help, and an officer must then be dispatched to the address.

WHEN CALLING 911 FROM A CELL PHONE

Know your location when calling 911 from a cell phone. Cell phones CAN NOT CURRENTLY provide the communications center your exact location. Have your address ready, or use landmarks, mile markers and road signs to describe where you are. Cell phones do not always direct you to the proper agency either. If this happens, remain patient and wait for the call taker to transfer you. Please know the cell phone number you are calling from, the communications center may need to contact you if the connection is lost.

DON'T LET KIDS PLAY WITH OLD CELL PHONES

Many people do not know this, but the law mandates that even old, deactivated cell phones with no associated service plans must still be able to call 9-1-1. An old cell phone may seem to be the perfect free toy, but giving your seemingly useless device to a youngster may lead to problems. So, if you want to turn that old phone into a play thing, be sure to remove the battery before turning it over to your inquisitive youngster.

WHAT ABOUT SENDING TEXT MESSAGES?

Text messages cannot be sent to 9-1-1 in Longmont, although some Emergency Call Centers have established a 10-digit number to which text messages can be sent. None of the cities within Boulder County have created such a number. There are limitations with the special 10-digit number so it will be several years before this service can be provided through the 9-1-1 system.

HOW DO I RECEIVE EMERGENCY NOTIFICATIONS IF I DON'T HAVE A LANDLINE PHONE ASSOCIATED WITH A FIXED ADDRESS SUCH AS MY HOME?

Go to the Everbridge Notification button to register to receive emergency notification messages on your cell phone, internet phone, email, text message or fax.


OUTDOOR WARNING SYSTEM

From April until August, the City of Longmont tests the outdoor warning system the first Monday of the month at 10am. This siren was intended for outdoor use and not to be heard while indoors. Additional information about the Longmont Outdoor Warning System can be found on the Longmont Office of Emergency Management page.


EMPLOYMENT

The Longmont Emergency Communications Center offers a career to take pride in, comprehensive paid training program, competitive salary, and state-of-the-art communications facility.

Current Job Postings for 911 Emergency Dispatchers can be found at http://www.ci.longmont.co.us/human_resources/jobs/index.htm

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To reach the Manager for the Longmont Emergency Communications Center you can email or call (303)651-8550.


 

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